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Will Carbohydrates Be The Cause Of Your DEATH?

By Kevin DiDonato MS, CSCS, CES


There is one word in the English language which can provoke a number of different emotions.

Fear, sadness, and empathy are some quick ones that come to mind.

This disease is deadly, and currently there is NO CURE.

The disease I am referring to is Cancer.

There are many different risk factors which are unavoidable.

Age, family history, and gender cannot be changed

But other risk factors, if changed, may DRAMATICALLY reduce your chances of developing Cancer.

Let me explain…

Obesity and Cancer Risk

There are many risk factors that can be prevented.

One, if not the most IMPORTANT risk factor, is your weight.

Overweight women have an increased risk of developing
breast cancer or other types of cancer

Why?

TWO main reasons: estrogen and insulin.

There are two ways your body produces estrogen.

Your ovaries produce estrogen and regulate your hormone levels.

But the second way might SURPRISE you.

Your fat cells!

And yes, they actually release estrogen.

And if you are overweight when your hit
menopause it may get worse

Normally, your ovaries produce estrogen.

But after menopause, your ovaries stop the production and release of estrogen.

And you already know your fat releases estrogen.

So with increased fat stores, you produce MORE estrogen due to HIGHER LEVELS OF FAT.

And this may increase your risk for developing breast cancer.

Not only do extra fat stores release more estrogen, but it also increases your circulating insulin.

And there is a correlation between increased insulin
 and increased risk for cancer

So how can you reduce your risk factors?

Eating right, losing weight, and exercise are some ways.

But new research shows that intermittent and low-carbohydrate diets may reduce risk factors for developing certain types of cancer.

Intermittent and Low Carbohydrate vs. Normal Diets

Since your weight may be one of the biggest MODIFIABLE risk factors, reducing your weight may be in your best interest.

Researchers from the UK may be on to something.

They took three different types of diets, a low-carbohydrate diet, an intermittent low-carbohydrate diet, and the standard

Mediterranean diet, and they were put to the test.

Intermittent means 2 days of strict dieting followed
 by a standard dietary intake

The results were ASTONISHING!

They took 107 women, all with a family history of breast cancer.

They were randomly assigned to one of the diets listed above and studied for six months.

They found that the low-carbohydrate and intermittent low-carbohydrate diets were more successful at reducing risk factors.

The participants lost a total of nine pounds with both low-carbohydrate diets.

They also reduced their insulin concentration by 22% with the restricted carbohydrate diet, and 14% with the intermittent diet

The standard, 
Mediterranean diet resulted in 5 pounds lost, and reduction in their insulin concentration by only 4%!

Is It All InThe Diet?

Cancer can be a serious and deadly disease.

Accounting for a high number of deaths each year, cancer may be ONE of the deadliest diseases for women.

Reducing certain risk factors may help prevent your risk for developing cancer.

Increased fat stores may increase insulin levels and estrogen levels, which also may increase your risk.

Low-carbohydrate and intermittent-carbohydrate diets may reduce your weight and improve your insulin levels.

And this may reduce your risk factors for developing cancer.

Even though some risk factors cannot be changed, you ARE in control of other, more manageable risk factors, like your weight.

A proper diet, exercise, and plenty of essential fats may reduce your risk for cancer.


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